As an inter-faith network of religious leaders living with or affected by HIV, INERELA+ seeks to empower religious leaders through education, knowledge and skills to live positively, becoming symbols of hope and agents of change who will help eliminate stigma and discrimination within their congregations and communities.

INERELA+ is an international, interfaith network of religious leaders – both lay and ordained, women and men – who are living with or personally affected by HIV.

Inerela+ MISSION

Empower religious leaders through education, knowledge and skills to live positively, becoming symbols of hope and agents of change who will help eliminate stigma and discrimination and promote gender justice and human rights within their congregations and communities

Inerela+ GOAL

By 2019, INERELA+ will have contributed to, increased HIV testing and levels of disclosure; reduced HIV-related stigma and discrimination; reduced AIDS-related deaths and reduced human rights abuses, including gender-based violence among religious leaders living with and affected by HIV and their congregants, in Africa and the rest of the world.

Inerela+ VISION

A society free of HIV related stigma and discrimination, with empowered, resilient religious leaders living with or personally affected by HIV and AIDS.

INERELA+ IS GUIDED BY THE FOLLOWING VALUES

  • Acceptance
  • Accompaniment
  • Compassion
  • Courage
  • Integrity
  • Transparency
  • Inclusiveness
  • Upholding Human Rights

Strategic Objectives

To strengthen capacity of Religious leaders to be agents of change for HIV and TB prevention, care and treatment at individual, congregational and community levels.

To enhance capacity of Religious leaders as agents of change for human dignity and gender justice at individual, congregational and community levels.

Capacitate Religious Leaders to advocate and promote sexual reproductive, health and rights for adolescents and young people at congregational and community levels.

INERELA+’s core business is to eradicate all forms of stigma and discrimination and thus contribute to increased levels of HIV testing and disclosure, reduced AIDS-related deaths and human rights abuses.